Venue & Hospitality

Conference Dates: October 26-27, 2020

Hotel Services & Amenities

  • Audio/Visual Equipment Rental.
  • Business Center.
  • Business Phone Service.
  • Complimentary Printing Service.
  • Express Mail.
  • Fax.
  • Meeting Rooms.
  • Office Rental.
  • Photo Copying Service.
  • Secretarial Service.
  • Telex.
  • Typewriter.
  • Video Conference.
  • Video Messaging.
  • Video Phone.
  • ATM.
  • Baggage Storage.

Transportation

About City

Frankfurt, a central German city on the river Main, is a major financial hub that’s home to the European Central Bank. It’s the birthplace of famed writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, whose former home is now the Goethe House Museum. Like much of the city, it was damaged during World War II and later rebuilt. The reconstructed Altstadt (Old Town) is the site of Romberg, a square that hosts an annual Christmas market. “Frank ford at the is a metropolis and the largest city of the German federal state of Hesse, and its 746,878 (2017) inhabitants make it the fifth-largest city in Germany, after Berlin, Hamburg, Munich, and Cologne. On the River Main (a tributary of the Rhine), it forms a continuous conurbation with the neighbouring city of Offenbach am Main, and its urban area has a population of 2.3 million. The city is at the centre of the larger Rhine-Main Metropolitan Region, which has a population of 5.5 million and is Germany’s second-largest metropolitan region after the Rhine-Ruhr Region. Since the enlargement of the European Union in 2013, the geographic centre of the EU is about 40 km (25 mi) to the east of Frankfurt’s central business district. Like France and Franconia, the city is named after the Franks. Frankfurt is the largest city in the Rhine Franconian dialect area (Franconian dialects).

Frankfurt was a city state, the Free City of Frankfurt, for nearly five centuries, and was one of the most important cities of the Holy Roman Empire, as a site of imperial coronations; it lost its sovereignty upon the collapse of the empire in 1806 and then permanently in 1866, when it was annexed by the Kingdom of Prussia.